research news

Protein that causes frontotemporal dementia also implicated in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes have shown that low levels of the protein progranulin in the brain can increase the formation of amyloid-beta plaques (a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease), cause neuroinflammation, and worsen memory deficits in a mouse model of this condition. Conversely, by using a gene therapy approach to elevate progranulin levels, scientists were able to prevent these abnormalities and block cell death in this model.

research news

Research mimics brain cells to boost memory power

RMIT University researchers have brought ultra-fast, nano-scale data storage within striking reach, using technology that mimics the human brain.

The researchers have built a novel nano-structure that offers a new platform for the development of highly stable and reliable nanoscale memory devices.

The pioneering work will feature on a forthcoming cover of materials science journal Advanced Functional Materials (11 November).

research news

Signature of Aging in the Brain Identified

How the brain ages is still largely an open question -- in part because this organ is mostly insulated from direct contact with other systems in the body, including the blood and immune systems. In research that was recently published in Science, Weizmann Institute researchers Prof. Michal Schwartz of the Neurobiology Department and Dr. Ido Amit of Immunology Department found evidence of a unique "signature" that may be the "missing link" between cognitive decline and aging.

research news

New findings on how brain handles tactile sensations

The traditional understanding in neuroscience is that tactile sensations from the skin are only assembled to form a complete experience in the cerebral cortex, the most advanced part of the brain. However, this is challenged by new research findings from Lund University in Sweden that suggest both that other levels in the brain play a greater role than previously thought, and that a larger proportion of the brain's different structures are involved in the perception of touch.

research news

Brain chemical potential new hope in controlling Tourette Syndrome tics

A chemical in the brain plays a vital role in controlling the involuntary movements and vocal tics associated with Tourette Syndrome (TS), a new study has shown.

The research by psychologists at The University of Nottingham, published in the latest edition of the journal Current Biology, could offer a potential new target for the development of more effective treatments to suppress these unwanted symptoms.

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