research news

Secret of tetanus toxicity offers new way to treat motor neuron disease

The way that tetanus neurotoxin enters nerve cells has been discovered by University College London (UCL) scientists, who showed that this process can be blocked, offering a potential therapeutic intervention for tetanus. This newly-discovered pathway could be exploited to deliver therapies to the nervous system, opening up a whole new way to treat neurological disorders such as motor neuron disease and peripheral neuropathies.

research news

How do Tourette’s patients react to visual stimulation with their own self-image?

Tourette’s syndrome is characterized by tics caused in many by premonitory urges; sensations which give patients compulsion to act to relieve discomfort. Habit reversal therapy conditions patients into heightened awareness of premonitory urges and forced counteraction of the tic.  New research in Cognitive Neuroscience examines the effect on Tourette’s sufferers when exposed to their own image for a prolonged period. Could introduction of patients’ self-image reduce tics due to heightened self-awareness and subsequent self-imposed tic control?

research news

Stroke damage mechanism identified

Researchers have discovered a mechanism linked to the brain damage often suffered by stroke victims -- and are now searching for drugs to block it.

While strokes cut off blood supply to parts of the brain, much of the harm to survivors' memory and other cognitive function is often actually caused by "oxidative stress" in the hours and days after the blood supply resumes.

research news

Fragile X study offers hope of new autism treatment

Drug reverses behavioural symptoms in mice with a version of autism

People affected by a common inherited form of autism could be helped by a drug that is being tested as a treatment for cancer, according to researchers from the University of Edinburgh and McGill University.

Fragile X Syndrome is the most common genetic cause of autism spectrum disorders. It affects around 1 in 4,000 boys and 1 in 6,000 girls. Currently, there is no cure.

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